To Move or Not to Move in Brooklyn? That May Be Your Question

December 15th, 2014
move in Brooklyn

Is it time to make a move in Brooklyn?

As a Baby Boomer, chances are you have had to come to terms with one or more of the following by now:

  • Your home has become too big. You’re an Empty Nester now and no longer need 5 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Cleaning rooms you no longer use or need just isn’t practical.
  • You want to downsize your home maintenance. Lawn care and maintenance of your home’s exterior is overwhelming and burdensome.
  • You’ve retired. You need a new and more manageable lifestyle.
  • Your neighborhood is deteriorating. You are concerned about safety.
  • Stairs in your home, if you have them, have become hard to navigate.
  • Cash is needed, but your assets are tied up in your home.
  • You no longer drive. The availability of adequate transportation is a must.

Whatever the reason, choosing to move or not to move in Brooklyn takes a lot of planning. Moving is always stressful, but if you do your homework and know what to expect before deciding to move in Brooklyn, you’ll be happy with your new location.

There is a wide variety of independent living options available to you:

  • retirement homes or retirement communities
  • low-income or subsidized senior housing
  • 55+ or 62+ communities
  • senior apartments or congregate care housing
  • Continuing Care Retirement Communities
  • Active adult communities

Ask yourself these questions about each independent living option listed above before you make a move in Brooklyn:

  1. Will I have common interests with my neighbors or other residents?
  2. Are the people that will be around me friendly and helpful?
  3. Are support services timely?
  4. Is this move going to take me farther away from friends and family than I want to be?
  5. How active is the community? What kinds of activities are offered?
  6. How large is this community?
  7. Is medical care available at the facility? If not, is a medical care facility nearby?
  8. What amenities and services are included? If none are included, how much does it cost to add on services if I need or choose to want them later? Are the amenities and services outside of the facility within walking distance or is transportation needed?
  9. What is the climate like here?
  10. Do you feel safe coming and going at any time of day in this community?
  11. Are pets welcome?
  12. Can I comfortably handle the initial investment and monthly fees?

Moving is a major life change that can be tough to do. Feelings of anger, embarrassment, regret, grief for the loss of your home and memories of the old neighborhood, vulnerability, anxiousness, loss of control, longing for the way it used to be, are normal. It’s okay to admit that you are not as independent as you once were. It’s time to reach out to those you trust for support.

Give yourself time to mourn what once was and to adjust to your new home and living environment. A new chapter in your life has opened up. Look forward to and enjoy new experiences and relationships. Explore new interests, too.

To move or not to move in Brooklyn? For help with the answer to that question, call your Brooklyn Realtor, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, at (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email [email protected] today. You can trust me to sell your home for the best possible price and find the perfect independent living home for you.

More help for independent living for seniors:

 

Article Resource for this post:

http://www.seniorresource.com/house.htm


Your Brooklyn Realtor, Multiple Offers and You

November 30th, 2014
Brooklyn Realtor

List With Charles D’Alessandro, Your Brooklyn Realtor

When you list your home and the housing market is fierce, it is not uncommon for more than one offer to be given on your home. Multiple offers are a great problem to have! Plan for them.  Talk with your Brooklyn Realtor about all options available to you. Discuss with him about what to expect and how to handle situations that may come up with multiple offers. Sellers and agent work together. Collaborate with your Brooklyn Realtor and set up a standard policy to handle multiple offers before they start coming in. Knowledge is power, and your agent will work in your behalf. He will keep you informed throughout the entire process from beginning to end so that you can make a good decision.  Working with your Brooklyn Realtor is like a marriage – come together and make the sale of your home happen!

Your Brooklyn Realtor is your representative. He does everything on your behalf. He presents each contract to you and provides his advice on each one. He will work together with you to get the greatest amount of money from the sale of your home with the least amount of stress.

Every offer should be in writing. Proof the buyers have the money for the sale and proper financing to support the offer should accompany their offer. Remember, your Brooklyn Realtor is your representative who works in your behalf, and therefore, all offers should be discussed with him. He will help you understand each offer as they come in, and you will be able to make an educated decision based on clear understanding of what to do with each offer on your home. For instance, an offer of $400,000 cash is a strong offer and could be better than a $405,000 offer with 5% down. Your Brooklyn Realtor is here to help you understand why, and he will explain everything.

What if you’ve accepted an offer when another that seems better is received? What if you accept a first offer but it has not yet been delivered to the purchaser? In either of these situations, talk with your Brooklyn Realtor. He is knowledgeable and easy to talk to.  He will help you know what to do.

Ultimately, you must decide what is best for you and your situation. The option to accept an offer and close it is in your hands, but you and your Brooklyn Realtor must work together to obtain the best offer for the sale of your home with minimal stress.

Ask your Brooklyn Realtor about how the selling process should happen and make sure you are on the same page. Don’t forget that he works for you. You are in a partnership with him. Trust him. He has your best interest at heart to obtain the ultimate goal – the best price for the sale of your home – with as little stress as possible

Selling or buying a home does not have to be stressful. Click on the link provided for more information on selling and buying a house:

http://www.brooklynrealestateblog.com/buying-or-selling-your-brooklyn-real-estate-does-not-have-to-be-stressful/

I have been collaborating with and helping clients purchase or sell their Brooklyn homes for over 27 years. I am knowledgeable and will represent you well to get you the best possible price on your home. Hire your Brooklyn Realtor, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, Call  (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email [email protected] today.


Are You Dreading Spending Another Winter in Brooklyn?

November 21st, 2014

 

winter in Brooklyn

Your Brooklyn Realtor Charles shoveling snow during the winter in Brooklyn

December 2014 weather predictions: temperature 37 degrees (2 degrees below avg.); precipitation 6” (3” above avg.); Dec 1-2: Heavy rain, then sunny, mild; Dec 3-5: Heavy rain, then sunny, mild; Dec 6-13: Rain to snow, then flurries, cold; Dec 14-17: Heavy rain, then flurries, cold; Dec 13-21: Stormy, rain and snow, then sunny, cold; Dec 22-29: Rain and snow, then sunny, cold; Dec 30-31: Snowy, cold.

The end of November is approaching, and the temperature has been dropping. Winter is coming, and it is going to be cold! The 2014-2015 Farmers’ Almanac predicts that winter in Brooklyn “will be colder and slightly wetter than normal, with above-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in late December and early and mid-January. The snowiest periods will be in mid- and late December, mid-January, and early to mid-February.”

Has this thought crossed your mind, “Do I want to go through this again?” Do these predictions of oncoming snow and cold encourage you to fly south to a warmer location? Are you considering purchasing a second home to avoid winter in Brooklyn?

Whether or not you choose to migrate south with other snowbirds to avoid spending another winter in Brooklyn, there are a few home maintenance tasks to check off your to-do list to winterize your home. Write these tasks down and get to work before it’s too cold:

  1. Make sure weather stripping on your doors is in place.
  2. Caulk windows.
  3. Switch your blades to run clockwise to push warmer air down.
  4. Invest in a programmable thermostat.
  5. Replace the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors even if they’re not beeping.
  6. Clean out gutters and downspouts.
  7. Winterize your air conditioner.
  8. Replace or clean furnace filters.
  9. Insulate exposed water pipes and give the water heater an insulated jacket.

Now your home is ready for winter in Brooklyn.

winter in Brooklyn

Winter in Brooklyn – A warm “Hello”

Snowbirds usually take flight to spend the winter in warmer locales such as California, Arizona, Florida, Texas, the Carolinas or elsewhere along the Sun Belt.

Snowbird? What’s a snowbird? Wikipedia defines snowbirds as “typically retirees who wish to avoid the snow and cold temperatures of northern winter, but maintain ties with family and friends by staying there the rest of the year.

“A significant portion of the snowbird community is made up of recreational vehicle users (RVers). Many own a motorhome for the sole purpose of traveling south in the winter. Many RV parks label themselves “snowbird friendly.”

No matter where you choose to fly south for the winter, you’ll want to think about the weather there before choosing.

  1. Are the daily highs averaging between 63 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit for seven or more months of the year?
  2. Is there less than 60 inches of rain a year?
  3. Does the sun shine for at least 60 percent of the time on a yearly average?

The top ten states with the best weather year round are:

  1. California
  2. Hawaii
  3. Texas
  4. Arizona
  5. Florida
  6. Georgia
  7. South Carolina
  8. Delaware
  9. North Carolina
  10. Louisiana

Runner-up states to consider spending the winter in Brooklyn are:

  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Tennessee
  • West Virginia

In addition to weather, consider the tax environment of each locale listed above. Florida, for example, has no income tax. Most of the lowest per-capita tax states are in the South, partly because of the lower income in regions of the South.

Another point to consider is that when you retire, your income usually falls. This could make saving on heating costs extremely important. Look into the answer to this question, “Will what I save on heating be spent on the cost of air conditioning in this locale?” The answer could be the deciding factor on where you will stay while it’s winter in Brooklyn.

If you are dreading spending another winter in Brooklyn and are considering selling in order to relocate or have questions about purchasing a second home in a warmer locale, contact me,  Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, or call (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 for answers. I am knowledgeable and easy to talk with. Your real estate needs are top priority with me. I can also be reached by email at [email protected].


Micro-Living in Brooklyn

October 30th, 2014
Micro-living in Brooklyn

Micro-living in Brooklyn – My Micro NY units will be constructed by Capsys in the Brooklyn Navy yards. Photo credit: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671701/micro-apartments-give-a-hint-of-city-livings-future

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment

In a previous blog post about downsizing, one of the questions asked was “How much living space do you really need?” Could you live in a 300 square foot apartment in Brooklyn? Data shows that today’s renters have an obsession with micro-living. Because rent is so expensive, more and more city folk are living alone. It makes sense for developers to invest in and provide small-unit, high-density buildings for the sake of cost, efficiency and affordability. The “walkability” of Brooklyn makes the city prime for micro-living because residents can easily access grocery stores, parks and other things that provide quality of life just outside of where they live.

What is the Meaning of “Micro”?

Every area has a different definition of “micro.” A micro-apartment has been defined by the City of Seattle, Washington, as “a small, typically urban, self-contained apartment that is between 150-350 square feet.” Wikipedi agrees on this size of “micro” and defines a micro-apartment, apodment or micro-flat, as “a one-room, self-contained living space, usually purpose built, designed to accommodate a sitting space, sleeping space, bathroom and kitchenette within around 150-350 square feet. Residents may also have access to a communal kitchen, patio and roof garden.” Most real estate experts define micro-units as any apartment having less than 500 square feet that is constructed for efficiency.

What is the Micro-Living Trend in Brooklyn?

Fewer two-bedrooms are being built by developers now than they were in 2000, according to research.

As the cost of rent increases, new apartment buildings are counting on studio and one-bedroom apartments as real estate’s answer to the question, “If millennials are living together and divvying up the cost of two- or three-bedroom apartments in nice buildings, why don’t we offer smaller spaces for one tenant to afford living alone?”

Micro-living appeals to millenials. Mini-apartments, ranging from 350 to 600 square feet, are built with young hipsters under the age of 30 and especially under the age of 27.

High-quality finishes and fixtures, oak flooring, stainless-steel appliances, movable islands, Bosch washers and dryers, well-designed floor plans and double-door closets with shelving come standard with some micro-apartments. Some micro-apartment buildings accommodate their tenants with features like rooftop grilling stations, seating areas or a penthouse lounge providing the opportunity to socialize and entertain guests. Others might have 9-foot ceilings with floor-to-ceiling glass, a glass-bottom pool, gardening plots, volleyball courts and other rooftop niceties.

Big cities are experimenting with micro-unit apartments. Brooklyn is just one of them. Some cities are deterred by local laws from building micro-units because of the minimum apartment size requirements.

In 2013, Brooklyn developer Monadnock Construction won the micro-unit competition and acquired the loan to build Manhattan’s first micro-unit rental property for micro-living, My Micro NY. This multi-unit building will be a nine-story tower built at 335 E. 27th Street in Kips Bay next year. Each of the 55 prefab units will come with almost 10-foot ceilings, seven-foot-wide balconies, 16-foot-long overhead loft spaces and full-sized closets making these 300 square foot units feel spacious. They were designed with the cabin of a ship in mind and will be long and thin, full of hidden details. The My Micro NY unit skeletons will be built at Capsys Corporation in the Brooklyn Navy yards and then stacked with a crane on the Kips Bay site. My Micro NY units will be available for rent in 2015 and nearly half of the 55 micro-apartments will be priced below market.

Micro-apartments, micro-flats, apodments or micro-units, whatever you choose to call these newly termed efficiency apartments for micro-living, are often nicer and more affordable than the traditional one-bedroom apartment in Brooklyn. Every square foot becomes vital and important in a micro-unit. You must remain code-compliant while working to get maximum use out of minimal space. Well-designed floor plans, carefully laid out space, built-ins and small appliances are the key to getting a micro-unit to work.

The micro-unit will become a growing part of the real estate market as the demand for apartments continues to pass the supply in many cities.

Are you a 20-something single millenial with an obsession for micro-living? Are you a baby boomer looking to downsize your life, save money, improve the overall quality of your life in Brooklyn or gain economic freedom? Call me, Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, at (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 or email [email protected] today. Whether you are a single millennial with an obsession for micro-living or a downsizing baby boomer, whatever your reason for interest in a micro-unit, I am your Brooklyn real estate agent who will help you find what you’re looking for!

Resources:

http://www.lifeedited.com/what-the-heck-is-a-micro-apartment/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/realestate/micro-units-coming-to-desirable-locations-in-the-district/2014/07/17/07e0a33e-f63c-11e3-8aa9-dad2ec039789_story.html

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671701/micro-apartments-give-a-hint-of-city-livings-future


Downsizing in Brooklyn – Thinking Big by Living Small

October 15th, 2014
downsizing in Brooklyn

Downsizing in Brooklyn – thinking big by living small

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment

What is downsizing? It is the concept of living simpler, utilizing space to its fullest. It is having fewer financial burdens, living in a home that requires minimal maintenance. It is getting rid of excess stuff that has been accumulated over time and paring down to basic essentials. After all, how much stuff do we really need to live a normal life? How much living space do we really need? There’s a trendy movement among us called micro-living. Fans of micro-living swear by it, and they are encouraging others in Brooklyn to start thinking big by living small.

Many people live beyond their means and accumulate stuff over time. Living beyond your means creates one or more of the following realities in day-to-day life that must be dealt with, sooner than later:

  • Excessive debt
  • Too much stuff
  • Debilitating stress

Enter the desire for change, the desire for simplicity, the desire for downsizing. Downsizing in Brooklyn can be stressful, but the benefits listed below far outweigh the negatives. Advocates of micro-living say downsizing will:

  • Increase cash flow
  • Provide more time
  • Lower utility bills
  • Reduce consumption
  • Minimize stress

Downsizing in Brooklyn requires:

  • Assessing your actual needs
  • Prioritizing needs versus wants
  • Getting rid of clutter. (If you don’t need or use an item within 6 months, give, sell or throw it away). (When you come across boxes of items that haven’t seen the light of day for years, get rid of them at once. You don’t need them).
  • Donating electronics and furniture
  • Moving to within walking distance of work, grocery shopping and downtown amenities

Once your downsizing in Brooklyn is complete, try to stay organized. Be ruthless about what enters your space. Then, relax and enjoy surrounding yourself with only those things that are truly most important to you. You’ll be able to rest a little easier knowing that a move to living a simpler life will be smoother, too.

And, of course, your Brooklyn area real estate agent, Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, knows where the smaller and good-quality houses are. I will find you just the right location to meet your needs for downsizing in Brooklyn. Contact me by email at [email protected] or by phone at (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 today.


Helping Your Loved One Prepare for a Move in Brooklyn

September 30th, 2014
prepare for a move in Brooklyn

Help your loved one prepare for a move in Brooklyn. Organize, clear clutter and make repairs.

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment

This is the fourth in a series of blogs on caregivers, their loved ones and assisted living in Brooklyn.

In the previous blog post, Taking Care of the Caregiver, we focused on taking care of you, the caregiver. This blog post will focus on helping your loved one prepare for a move in Brooklyn.

It is clear that your loved one is no longer able to live independently on their own. You and your family have lovingly and carefully considered all housing and care options available to your loved one. In their best interest, you have decided to sell their home and move them in to live with others who will provide assistance and proper care. Now what? It’s time to organize, clear clutter, make repairs and prepare for a move in Brooklyn.

When someone lives in a home for many years, accumulation of stuff and clutter happens, a lot of it happens. Repairs need to be made. Now it’s time to sell, and all of a sudden the collection of stuff and so many repairs through all those years of living looms overhead like an enormous elephant! Is organizing, clearing clutter and making needed repairs to prepare for a move in Brooklyn overwhelming? Is it keeping you from getting started? Ask yourself this question, “What is the best way to eat an elephant?” The answer is, “One bite at a time.”

Professional help to prepare for a move in Brooklyn is available. However, if you choose to tackle the task alone, consider these very helpful suggestions:

  1. Sort stuff. Start small. Choose one area of the home. Try the kitchen counter or just one closet, for example. Do not move to another area until the area you are working on is finished.
    1. Grab boxes. Label them “Trash,” “Keep,” “Give Away” and “Urgent.” If something has not been used or thought about for the past 6 months, place it in the “Trash” box. This is the perfect time to “Give Away” collections. For example, share your loved one’s owl collection with those who have always admired the special owl collection.
    2. Do something with each of the boxes NOW! Throw the “Trash” boxes away NOW!File the “Keep” boxes or put this stuff where it belongs NOW! Share the “Give Away” boxes away NOW! Address the “Urgent” boxes NOW!  If you don’t do it “NOW,” you’ll be back at square one.
  2. Get help to determine what repairs must be made to your loved one’s Brooklyn home. Don’t worry about any repairs that do not need to be made. Hire an expert to make the repairs for the purpose of selling the home.
  3. Remove heavy window treatments. Allow sunlight to lighten and brighten the rooms of your loved one’s home. Consider hiring someone to add a neutral coat of paint to walls and trim.
  4. Lastly, hire a house cleaner. After organizing, clearing clutter and repairing is complete, treat yourself to professional housecleaning of your loved one’s Brooklyn home. Getting the whole house cleaned in just one day is very rewarding. This last step may convert you to organizing and clearing clutter in your own home regularly. It’s that rewarding!

If the need to help your loved one prepare for a move in Brooklyn has arrived, contact me, Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate. Call (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 or reach me by email, [email protected].

 

Resources on Getting Organized –

http://www.napo.net/get_organized/how_to_hire.aspx

https://www.findmyorganizer.com/organize.b.507.g.34.html?professional_organizer_region=new+york&page=1

 

Recommended Reading -

Moving for Seniors: A Step-by-Step Workbook, Morris, B., 2001, Smooth Transitions.

 

Brooklyn/New York Senior Housing Options –

http://www.aplaceformom.com/assisted-living/new-york/brooklyn
http://www.seniorhomes.com/c/ny/brooklyn/assisted-living/

 

Copyright: joannsnover / 123RF Stock Photo

 


Taking Care of the Caregiver

September 15th, 2014

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment 

caregiver

Care of the caregiver is an important part of the job

This is the third in a series of blogs on caregivers, their loved ones and assisted living in Brooklyn.

In the previous blog post, we focused on caregivers and relocating your loved one in Brooklyn. This blog post will focus on you, the caregiver.

  • Are you a baby boomer, a 50-something?
  • Are your kids graduating high school and/or college?
  • Are your kids unable to find jobs?
  • Did your parent’s caregiver take advantage of them and embezzle funds, lots of funds, from your parent?
  • Do you feel that everyone needs your time or that you are being pulled in all directions?
  • Does the money you earn keep flying out the door for emergencies or the unexpected financial needs of your kids and/or parents?

Do you wonder:

  • “When and how can I plan for my future?”
  • “How can I retire at 65?”
  • “Is it possible to save for retirement if I am taking care of everyone else?”
  • “Should I move my parents into an assisted living facility or move them in with us?”
  • “When is it going to be all about me?”

As a baby boomer who has taken on the weighty role of caregiver, you face a greater chance for sizeable health problems, such as:

  • depression (studies show that roughly 46 percent to 59 percent of caregivers are clinically depressed)
  • chronic illness (high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity)
  • possible decay in quality of life
  • even the possibility of an earlier death

Reports show that caregivers battle with:

  • sleep deprivation
  • poor eating habits
  • failure to exercise
  • failure to stay in bed when they are not well
  • scheduling and keeping medical appointments for themselves

Caring for your loved one can be an exceptionally fulfilling experience. It proves the enormous amount of love and commitment you have for your loved one. But caregiving can be an emotional roller coaster bringing with it enormous stress caused by exhaustion, worry, lack of resources and demands of nonstop care.

Because of the effects of caregiving, you MUST make time to practice preventive healthcare and routine self-care. Pay attention to your own health and well-being while managing all the responsibilities as a caregiver so that you are able to provide the effective care your loved ones need.

Remember, it is not selfish to pay attention to your own needs and desires as a caregiver. Taking care of the caregiver is an important part of the job.

  • Learn and use stress-reduction techniques
  • Attend to your own healthcare needs
  • Get proper rest and nutrition
  • Exercise regularly, if only for 10 minutes at a time
  • Take time off without feeling guilty
  • Participate in enjoyable, encouraging activities, such as reading a good book, taking a warm bath
  • Pursue and accept the help of others
  • Seek reassuring counseling whenever you need it or talk to a counselor, friend or pastor
  • Recognize and allow your feelings
  • Always look for the positive in every situation and change any negative views of situations that you may have
  • Set goals and celebrate each one you achieve

It’s up to you!

Moving your loved one into your home to live with everyone in your family may seem like the noble, loving, dutiful and right thing to do, but is it really in the best interest of your loved one, your spouse, your family and you? This decision is not an easy one to make.

If you have taken on the role of caregiver, and it is time to move your loved one into your Brooklyn home or into an assisted care facility in Brooklyn, contact Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, or call (718) 253-9600 ext. 206. You can reach me by email, [email protected], also.

 

Recommended Reading -

Moving for Seniors: A Step-by-Step Workbook, Morris, B., 2001, Smooth Transitions.

 

Brooklyn/New York Senior Housing Options –

http://www.aplaceformom.com/assisted-living/new-york/brooklyn
http://www.seniorhomes.com/c/ny/brooklyn/assisted-living/

 

More Resources –

Family Caregiver Alliance
785 Market Street, Ste. 750
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 434-3388
(800) 445-8106
Website: caregiver.org
E-mail: [email protected]

Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) seeks to improve the quality of life for caregivers through education, services, research and advocacy.

FCA’s National Center on Caregiving offers advice and information on current social, public policy and caregiving issues and provides assistance in the development of public and private caregiver support programs.

Family Care Navigator – FCA’s online directory of resources for caregivers in all 50 states. Includes resources for older or disabled adults living at home or in a residential facility, and information on government health and disability programs, legal resources, disease-specific organizations and more.

Article Resource: https://caregiver.org/taking-care-you-self-care-family-caregivers


Relocating Your Loved One in Brooklyn

August 30th, 2014
relocating your loved one in Brooklyn

Is relocating your loved one in Brooklyn the best decision for them?

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment

This is the second in a series of blogs on caregivers, their loved ones and housing for a loved one in Brooklyn.

In the previous blog post, we focused on caregivers and determining the best housing for a loved one in Brooklyn. This blog post will focus on relocating your loved one in Brooklyn.

Life happens. Our loved ones age. The diagnosis of a devastating disease is given. A chronic health issue appears. Frailty creeps in. A permanent injury caused by an accident changes daily life as we have known it. We don’t know if or when life will call upon us to take on the tremendous role of caregiver, but it is a likely reality that many of us will face. Have any of the following situations occurred with your loved one?

  • You visit your loved one and find their refrigerator is practically empty, their bills are unpaid and past due notices are accumulating, their house is a confusion of clutter
  • A concerned neighbor called to let you that your loved one was found walking aimlessly in the streets, unable to find home, the place where they have lived for the past 30 years
  • Your loved one has been forgetting to take their diabetes medications, greatly jeopardizing their health
  • Your very self-sufficient loved one fell. Their hip is broken, and they can no longer walk up or down the stairs in their home.

Occurrences like these may indicate trouble for your loved one due to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia or some other major change in their health. Reasons for these occurrences should be investigated. It may be time to consider relocating your loved one in Brooklyn.

Because relocating your loved one is a major life change for them and for those who love them, everything should be analyzed thoroughly. Get lots of advice. An outside counselor may help you in considering every possible issue regarding relocating your loved one in Brooklyn. Visit http://www.elderlawanswers.com/new-york-elder-law-attorneys/new-york for a list of New York attorneys specializing in elder law. They can help guide your family in estate and long-term care planning for your loved one.  Deciding to relocate your loved one is an important and challenging decision. When you are trying to decide whether relocating your loved one in Brooklyn is best for them or not, discussions with them and all others concerned is especially important. Encourage everyone to share their thoughts. This will help you make the best decisions for your loved one. Good communication and a strong support system are vital in the relocating process. Talk about your loved one’s:

  • possible living options, all of them
  • needed type of care
  • finances
  • relocation and the roles each person will take on
  • lifestyle changes and adjustments that will need to be made
  • new home and the location of their new home

What is expected and hoped for must be well defined and made very clear to everyone involved. Consider the level of care your loved one needs and all family issues, if there are any, to help direct your planning. Packing and moving is a major job for everyone at any age. But for the elderly who have lived in a home for many years with as many memories and possessions and who have developed strong ties to their community, family, friends, healthcare providers, social life and daily routine, relocating:

  • can be extremely difficult
  • can cause an enormous amount of sadness
  • denotes a tremendous emotional challenge
  • poses a decrease in independence
  • signals a new life stage

The thought of packing and sorting through history, memories and possessions may be overwhelming and delay relocating your loved one in Brooklyn. You may want to look into a company that specializes in organizing a move and arranges to sell or give away furniture and possessions that are no longer needed. They also help pack and unpack. Whether or not you choose to hire help, all involved play key roles in the relocating process. Keep the lines of communication open to help you move through each of the challenges relocating your loved one brings with it. If your loved one owns the home they are moving out of, consider renting it for these reasons:

  1. rent payments can help cover extra upcoming costs
  2. help pay for added care services
  3. offer certain tax benefits
  4. give your loved one more time to adjust to new living arrangements.

Selling the place they have called home for so many years can seem very final and can add a certain measure of anxiety to relocating to a new place. Give your loved one time to adjust to their new living arrangements. Patience and support will help relocating happen with a greater amount of ease.

Caregiving does not come free of challenges, but it does provide an extraordinary opportunity to give back what was once provided to you. Giving back that support and care to a loved one is one of the most rewarding experiences in life. Allow your loved one to talk of their past. Others will learn and enjoy actual living history that can only be read about in our history books.

If you have any questions about relocating your loved one in Brooklyn or wonder if renting or selling might be best for them, please contact me, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, or call (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 for answers. You can reach me by email, [email protected], also.

 

Recommended Reading -

Elder Care Made Easier, Somers, M., 2006, Addicus Books.

How to Care for Aging Parents: A Complete GuideMorris, V., 2004, Workman Publishing.

Moving for Seniors: A Step-by-Step Workbook, Morris, B., 2001, Smooth Transitions.

The Essential Guide to Caring for Aging Parents, Rhodes, L., 2012. Alpha Books (Penguin Group).

 

FCA Fact Sheet – Downsizing A Home: A Checklist for Caregivers, https://www.caregiver.org/downsizing-home-checklist-caregivers

 

Senior Care, Housing Options Resources -

For great articles on illnesses and symptoms your loved one may be facing, visit

http://www.aplaceformom.com/senior-care-resources/articles

http://www.seniorhomes.com/

 

Brooklyn/New York Senior Housing Options –

http://www.aplaceformom.com/assisted-living/new-york/brooklyn

http://www.seniorhomes.com/c/ny/brooklyn/assisted-living/

 

More Resources -

Family Caregiver Alliance

785 Market Street, Ste. 750

San Francisco, CA 94103

(415) 434-3388

(800) 445-8106

Website: caregiver.org

E-mail: [email protected]

Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) seeks to improve the quality of life for caregivers through education, services, research and advocacy.

FCA’s National Center on Caregiving offers advice and information on current social, public policy and caregiving issues and provides assistance in the development of public and private caregiver support programs.

Family Care Navigator – FCA’s online directory of resources for caregivers in all 50 states. Includes resources for older or disabled adults living at home or in a residential facility, and information on government health and disability programs, legal resources, disease-specific organizations and more.

 

Article Resource: https://www.caregiver.org/preparing-for-caregiving

Copyright: iofoto / 123RF Stock Photo


Determining the Best Housing for a Loved One

August 14th, 2014

by Charles D’Alessandro | Leave a Comment  

best housing for a loved one

Caregivers may need help determining the best housing for a loved one

This is the first in a series of blogs on caregivers, their loved ones and determining the best housing for a loved one in Brooklyn.

A caregiver is defined as one who provides support to a loved one who may be feeble from old age or disease, or who may not be as strong or as stable of mind as they once were. The list of care a caregiver provides is a long one. In this blog post we will focus on caregivers and determining the best housing for a loved one in Brooklyn.

Assisting or handling the real estate or housing needs of a loved one as their caregiver  is quite different from buying or selling a home for yourself.  When determining the best housing for a loved one in your care, it may help to consider the following:

  1. Pursue in-home support services and community services for their continued independence. If in-home support services and community services are needed and available, acquire them. The feeling of being independent is precious to a senior.
  2. Don’t do what your loved one is capable of doing for themselves. If they are able to pay their bills and cook their meals, let them. Allowing them to maintain as much of their independence as they can will make them feel better about receiving the care they now need from you.
  3. Unless they are not able to make decisions for themselves or their behavior could put others in danger, honor their right to make decisions about their life while they are able to.
  4. Provide them with the basic freedom of making choices. Allow them to choose where to live, what to wear or what to eat for dinner. The ability to make choices on their own may diminish over time. As their health declines, people dear to them pass away or finances start to tighten, the ability to communicate who they are through their choices will become harder for them to do.

To help you in determining the best housing for a loved one, present and discuss these questions with them:

  • What standard of living do you want for yourself?
  • What surroundings would you enjoy?
  • Is location important to you?
  • Would you like to be near family and friends, doctors, pharmacies, doctors offices, shopping, senior centers, a church and other comforts or conveniences?
  • Consider your current health situation. Do you need to look for a place with features that will allow you to move about easily?
  • Can you afford the cost of the type of housing you would like to live in?
  • Does the type of housing you like include in-home support services of any kind?
  • Are you eligible for publicly-funded or subsidized services such as Medicare or Medicaid?
  • Will the in-home support services that are available to you now be available in the future, also?
  • Have you included appropriate family members and friends in your decision making?
  • Have you determined the role others will have in making decisions for you and with you in the future?
  • Would you like to speak with an attorney to make sure that you understand your rights and get answers to any legal questions you may have?

The best housing for a loved one is the one that makes certain their health, social and financial needs are well taken care of and that their legal rights are protected.  Your ultimate goal should be to help your loved one enjoy independent living at home for as long as they possibly can. So, plan carefully, take good care of yourself and get informed about caregiving.

Senior Care, Housing Options Resources
For great articles on s illnesses and symptoms your loved one may be facing,visit

http://www.aplaceformom.com/senior-care-resources/articles
http://www.seniorhomes.com/

Brooklyn/New York Senior Housing Options -

http://www.aplaceformom.com/assisted-living/new-york/brooklyn
http://www.seniorhomes.com/c/ny/brooklyn/assisted-living/

If you have any questions about determining the best housing for a loved one or wonder if selling and relocating might be best for them, please contact me,  Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, or call (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 for answers. You can reach me by email, [email protected], also.

 

Photo Copyright: alexraths / 123RF Stock Photo


What is a Real Estate Seller’s Agent?

July 31st, 2014
Real Estate Seller's Agent

Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn Real Estate Seller’s Agent

In a previous blog post I explained what a Buyer’s Agent is and what this type of real estate agent does for his clients. This week let’s talk about what a Real Estate Seller’s Agent is and what he does for his clients.

A Real Estate Seller’s Agent is a professional real estate agent, also known as a listing agent. He acts solely on your behalf and in your best interest as the property seller in a real estate transaction. His loyalties are with you. It is his duty to share with you all information about potential buyers that may help you make decisions regarding the transaction. He is legally obligated to represent you and your financial interests as a seller.

What does a Real Estate Seller’s Agent do for you as the seller? From the moment you sign a listing contract, (a legally binding agreement that usually gives your Real Estate Seller’s Agent the exclusive right to sell your property usually within 60 to 90 days), your Real Estate Seller’s Agent:

  • advises you on the best ways to present and prepare your home to sell it and may even help arrange a home inspection. Your Seller’s Agent knows how to highlight your home’s amenities from its curb appeal to emptied closets. He knows what buyers want.
  • researches the market for recent sales of comparable homes to determine the best asking price.
  • prepares a marketing plan: schedule for listing, showing, and advertising your property.
  • provides you with a real property condition disclosure and other necessary forms.
  • places a “For Sale” sign with information flyers describing your home on-site. He markets your home to buyers on the internet, in classified ads, in real estate magazines, pamphlets, direct-mail flyers and newspaper ads.
  • lists your property for sale to the public on the Multiple Listing Service (the MLS, a searchable list of homes for sale).
  • takes other real estate agents on a walkthrough of your home, so they know what to tell their clients about your home.
  • serves as a contact to answer any questions about your home and schedule showings.
  • holds an open house to show your property.
  • makes sure buyers are pre-screened and that they are financially suitable to buy your home.
  • acts as a trustee for you. This could include preparing a standard real estate purchase contract for you.
  • finds a buyer for your property for the highest possible price on the best terms for you as the seller.
  • presents buyers’ offers to you
  • shares all information about potential buyers that will help you make decisions regarding the sale.
  • negotiates the price of your home on your behalf as the sellers as well as the terms of the sale. He is your representative in all negotiations.
  • is your messenger, manager, counter offer and contingency issues handler once an offer is made. He follows the paper trail from the initial offer from the buyer through to the final closing. He processes all the paperwork necessary to complete the transaction.

You pay for your Real Estate Seller’s Agent’s services with percentage commission of 4 to 6 percent or a flat fee. This is stated in your listing contract. The buyer’s agent can be paid from that fee.

Do you have more questions about what a Real Estate Seller’s Agent is? Subscribe to the Brooklyn Real Estate Blog or contact me to ask those questions and get them answered.

I am the Brooklyn Expert! I have been connecting clients with Brooklyn homes for over 27 years. I know the Brooklyn area inside and out. I am honest, and I know the right way to connect buyers with your Brooklyn home. Give your Real Estate Seller’s Agent, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, a call at (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email me at [email protected].