Archive for December, 2014

10 Ways to Prevent a Fall in Your Brooklyn Home

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
Prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home

Prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home

The number of serious and fatal injuries caused by falls is rising in America.

The New York Times reported in November, 2014:

“The number of people over 65 who died after a fall reached nearly 24,000 in 2012, almost double the number 10 years earlier, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

“More than 200,000 Americans over 65 dies after falls in the decade from 2002 to 2012. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death in that age group.”

“And more than 2.4 million people over 65 were treated in emergency departments for injuries from falls in 2012 alone, an increase of 50 percent over a decade.”

You may not see your need to do anything to prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home until after you have fallen, but a bad fall will certainly make you wish you had! A fall can seriously impact your health and independence, but they are not an unavoidable part of growing older. They can be prevented!

Here are 10 ways to prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home:

  1. Exercise – Exercise strengthens your legs and improves balance, making a fall in your Brooklyn home much less likely.
  2. Be aware of side effects – Side effects such as drowsiness or dizziness caused by medicines and combinations of medicines will make a fall in your Brooklyn home more likely. Talk about possible side effects of your medicines with your doctor or pharmacist.
  3. Get your eyes checked every year – Wearing glasses or contacts with the right prescription and seeing clearly will prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home.
  4. Identify potential home hazards – Tripping hazards, (papers, books, clothes, shoes, rugs), clutter and poor lighting should be identified and removed or changed to prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home.
  5. Install handrails and lights on your staircases in your Brooklyn home.
  6. Install grab bars, too. Put them inside and next to your tub or shower and next to the toilet.
  7. Use non-slip mats in the tub and shower.
  8. Avoid the need for a step stool. Keep items you use most often within easy reach in your Brooklyn home.
  9. Use bright lighting – You need brighter lights in your Brooklyn home in order to see well as you grow older.
  10. Wear shoes – Going barefoot or wearing slippers will prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home.

Stay safe, secure and independent while growing older. Prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home before you fall.

I can help you find the perfect home with all or almost all of the 10 ways to prevent a fall in your Brooklyn home. Give Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, a call at (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email me at charles@brooklynrealestatesales.com. Let’s start looking today!

Resources:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/03/health/bracing-for-the-falls-of-an-aging-nation.html?emc=edit_na_20141102&_r=0http://www.cdc.gov/Features/OlderAmericans/

To Move or Not to Move in Brooklyn? That May Be Your Question

Monday, December 15th, 2014
move in Brooklyn

Is it time to make a move in Brooklyn?

As a Baby Boomer, chances are you have had to come to terms with one or more of the following by now:

  • Your home has become too big. You’re an Empty Nester now and no longer need 5 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Cleaning rooms you no longer use or need just isn’t practical.
  • You want to downsize your home maintenance. Lawn care and maintenance of your home’s exterior is overwhelming and burdensome.
  • You’ve retired. You need a new and more manageable lifestyle.
  • Your neighborhood is deteriorating. You are concerned about safety.
  • Stairs in your home, if you have them, have become hard to navigate.
  • Cash is needed, but your assets are tied up in your home.
  • You no longer drive. The availability of adequate transportation is a must.

Whatever the reason, choosing to move or not to move in Brooklyn takes a lot of planning. Moving is always stressful, but if you do your homework and know what to expect before deciding to move in Brooklyn, you’ll be happy with your new location.

There is a wide variety of independent living options available to you:

  • retirement homes or retirement communities
  • low-income or subsidized senior housing
  • 55+ or 62+ communities
  • senior apartments or congregate care housing
  • Continuing Care Retirement Communities
  • Active adult communities

Ask yourself these questions about each independent living option listed above before you make a move in Brooklyn:

  1. Will I have common interests with my neighbors or other residents?
  2. Are the people that will be around me friendly and helpful?
  3. Are support services timely?
  4. Is this move going to take me farther away from friends and family than I want to be?
  5. How active is the community? What kinds of activities are offered?
  6. How large is this community?
  7. Is medical care available at the facility? If not, is a medical care facility nearby?
  8. What amenities and services are included? If none are included, how much does it cost to add on services if I need or choose to want them later? Are the amenities and services outside of the facility within walking distance or is transportation needed?
  9. What is the climate like here?
  10. Do you feel safe coming and going at any time of day in this community?
  11. Are pets welcome?
  12. Can I comfortably handle the initial investment and monthly fees?

Moving is a major life change that can be tough to do. Feelings of anger, embarrassment, regret, grief for the loss of your home and memories of the old neighborhood, vulnerability, anxiousness, loss of control, longing for the way it used to be, are normal. It’s okay to admit that you are not as independent as you once were. It’s time to reach out to those you trust for support.

Give yourself time to mourn what once was and to adjust to your new home and living environment. A new chapter in your life has opened up. Look forward to and enjoy new experiences and relationships. Explore new interests, too.

To move or not to move in Brooklyn? For help with the answer to that question, call your Brooklyn Realtor, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, at (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email charles@brooklynrealestatesales.com today. You can trust me to sell your home for the best possible price and find the perfect independent living home for you.

More help for independent living for seniors:

 

Article Resource for this post:

http://www.seniorresource.com/house.htm