Archive for the ‘Moving in Brooklyn’ Category

How You Can Avoid a Mess with Your Movers

Friday, June 30th, 2017
Movers

Use these tips to hire reputable, licensed, and experienced movers and avoid a stressful mess for your next move.

Moving is stressful, and buying and/or selling your home means moving. Is it possible to rid yourself of some of that stress by hiring professional movers? Yes and no. Believe it or not, there are pretty sad stories of lost, stolen, and broken belongings and surprise added charges told by those who hired professional movers. Avoid becoming the next moving horror story. Protect yourself and your belongings and make your move less stressful with a few moving tips.

9 Tips to Avoid the Stress Movers can Cause and Help Your Move Go Smoothly

  1. Research Movers Thoroughly

If you decide to hire movers, start early and take all the time needed to research moving companies thoroughly. Movers can steal, lose or recklessly damage belongings. Ask for references. Check reviews and the Better Business Bureau for ratings. If you’ll do your homework to make sure a moving company is reputable, licensed, and experienced, you’ll hire some great movers confidently. And just in case something should go awry, purchase insurance for your belongings.

  1. Book Movers In Advance

Moving companies get busy during the summer, just like real estate agents do. Start researching movers early, find one you can hire with confidence, and get on their schedule.

  1. Assess Your Belongings Honestly

Before you get a quote, assess your belongings with honesty. Your already high bill will only get higher if you end up moving more than originally discussed with your movers. Or worse, the truck they think will fit all your belongings won’t be big enough. Side note: If you downsize your belongings after receiving a quote, you could wind up paying more than necessary.

Find out whether or not the moving companies allow you to pay by the foot and what this entails. Paying by the foot means you pay only for the space you end up using, but you may have to share space with another customer.

  1. Ask About Labeling

Professional packers aren’t pros at labeling, so ask what their policy for labeling your boxes is. It’s quite common for movers not to label boxes, so make it your job to label each box as it’s packed. Label your boxes with your last name as well.

Here’s an idea our family used for our recent move. We created a moving legend (just an inexpensive notebook from Walmart) with tabs marked A, B, C, D, … (one letter for each room in the house which were color-coded to match the moving labels we purchased from Amazon). For example, we decided the A tab would be designated for everything packed from the kitchen, colored the A tab in the legend yellow, marked A1 in the moving legend in the A section, and listed all items packed in that box behind A1. (A1: measuring cups, measuring spoons, baking spatulas, cookie cutters, hand mixer, …) Then we marked that box with an A1 on three sides and slapped a yellow Kitchen label on two or three sides.

On moving day we put a yellow Kitchen label on the wall or door jam of the kitchen in our new home. All those who helped us unload the truck knew that all boxes with a yellow kitchen label were to go in the kitchen.

  1. Avoid Long-Carry Fees

Ever hear of “long-carry fees”? If your movers are unable to park the moving truck close to your home, they’ll tack long-carry fees onto your bill. Save yourself this added fee and the added time it will take to get the truck unloaded by blocking out close parking in advance. Park your cars in the spaces closest to the homes (old and new), use cones and signs, and talk with your neighbors to make sure the truck can be parked as close as possible on the day of the move.

  1. Measure Openings at the New Place

Measure the doorways and stairwells of your new home before moving day. Why? If movers are unable to get bulky furniture through openings at the new place, you’ll be forced to leave that furniture behind. You could ask for hoisting services, but that’ll cost you a pretty penny.

  1. Let the Movers Position the Big Stuff

Let the movers put the big stuff into position before they drive away at the end of moving day. Rugs and heavy items you can’t easily manage on your own should be put into position by the movers. Everything else can wait. Station yourself in your new home before the movers arrive to decide where you want the big stuff to go (and place those handy dandy moving labels on the door jams). Then be available to provide direction and answer the movers’ questions about your belongings.

  1. Read the Fine Print Carefully

At the end of the day you’ve moved into your new home, you’ll be “slightly” tired and ready for a long rest. This is the time the movers will ask you to sign off on the inventory sheet and your bill. Don’t give in to your exhaustion and just sign whatever the movers put in your hand without reading the fine print. Take the time to read everything before you sign anything.

  • Double check that everything that went into the truck actually arrived.
  • Carefully look over the bill and make sure there are no extra charges.
  • If you shared space with another customer, look inside the truck for belongings that may have been missed before it pulls away. Look closely for tiny items such as drawer knobs and shelf brackets, too.
  1. Locate the “Last-On, First-Off” Boxes

    You’ll appreciate this tip as soon as the movers drive away. Pack boxes labeled “Last On First Off” with bedding, pillows, pajamas, towels and washrags, toiletries, toilet paper, tissues, and cleaning and pet supplies. You get the picture, right? Then after the movers drive off, locate these boxes and prepare for a good night’s sleep! You will have earned it.

Hiring movers is stressful because moving is stressful, plain and simple. But there are things you can to do to keep your move from turning into a horror story. Minimize the stress. Do your research early, and hire a moving company that is reputable, licensed, and experienced. Need some referrals? Contact Charles D’Alessandro at (718) 253-9600 ext. 206 or email [email protected]. With over 30 years of real estate experience in Brooklyn, Charles D’Alessandro, your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate knows about good movers.

To Move or Not to Move in Brooklyn? That May Be Your Question

Monday, December 15th, 2014
move in Brooklyn

Is it time to make a move in Brooklyn?

As a Baby Boomer, chances are you have had to come to terms with one or more of the following by now:

  • Your home has become too big. You’re an Empty Nester now and no longer need 5 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Cleaning rooms you no longer use or need just isn’t practical.
  • You want to downsize your home maintenance. Lawn care and maintenance of your home’s exterior is overwhelming and burdensome.
  • You’ve retired. You need a new and more manageable lifestyle.
  • Your neighborhood is deteriorating. You are concerned about safety.
  • Stairs in your home, if you have them, have become hard to navigate.
  • Cash is needed, but your assets are tied up in your home.
  • You no longer drive. The availability of adequate transportation is a must.

Whatever the reason, choosing to move or not to move in Brooklyn takes a lot of planning. Moving is always stressful, but if you do your homework and know what to expect before deciding to move in Brooklyn, you’ll be happy with your new location.

There is a wide variety of independent living options available to you:

  • retirement homes or retirement communities
  • low-income or subsidized senior housing
  • 55+ or 62+ communities
  • senior apartments or congregate care housing
  • Continuing Care Retirement Communities
  • Active adult communities

Ask yourself these questions about each independent living option listed above before you make a move in Brooklyn:

  1. Will I have common interests with my neighbors or other residents?
  2. Are the people that will be around me friendly and helpful?
  3. Are support services timely?
  4. Is this move going to take me farther away from friends and family than I want to be?
  5. How active is the community? What kinds of activities are offered?
  6. How large is this community?
  7. Is medical care available at the facility? If not, is a medical care facility nearby?
  8. What amenities and services are included? If none are included, how much does it cost to add on services if I need or choose to want them later? Are the amenities and services outside of the facility within walking distance or is transportation needed?
  9. What is the climate like here?
  10. Do you feel safe coming and going at any time of day in this community?
  11. Are pets welcome?
  12. Can I comfortably handle the initial investment and monthly fees?

Moving is a major life change that can be tough to do. Feelings of anger, embarrassment, regret, grief for the loss of your home and memories of the old neighborhood, vulnerability, anxiousness, loss of control, longing for the way it used to be, are normal. It’s okay to admit that you are not as independent as you once were. It’s time to reach out to those you trust for support.

Give yourself time to mourn what once was and to adjust to your new home and living environment. A new chapter in your life has opened up. Look forward to and enjoy new experiences and relationships. Explore new interests, too.

To move or not to move in Brooklyn? For help with the answer to that question, call your Brooklyn Realtor, Charles D’Alessandro Your Brooklyn real estate agent with Fillmore Real Estate, at (718) 253-9600 ext 206 or email [email protected] today. You can trust me to sell your home for the best possible price and find the perfect independent living home for you.

More help for independent living for seniors:

 

Article Resource for this post:

http://www.seniorresource.com/house.htm